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Sunday, August 30, 2009

Old Dog In A Locket

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Old Dog in a Locket
Old dog in a locket,
That lays next to my heart;
I will always love you,
As I did right from the start.
You were right beside me,
Through the darkest of my days;
It was your kind and gentle nature,
That made me want to stay.
Now I hold you in my arms,
Your breath still warm against my hand;
Our hearts still beat together,
And I wonder if you understand.
Through the hours that I held you,
Before the light did leave your soul;
I knew a way to keep you,
Forever in my hold.
I snipped the hair from around your eyes,
So I would always see;
The beauty that surrounds me,
Even in times of need.
I snipped the hair from around your ears,
So I would always hear;
Music in the distance,
To quiet any fears.
I snipped the hair from across your back,
To bring me strength in time of need;
And the power of your essence,
Would always be with me.
I snipped the hair from around your heart,
That beat in time with mine;
So I would know that love would find me,
At some distant time.
And so, your life slipped out of mine,
On a quiet Spring-like day;
But I knew that a part of you,
Was always here to stay.
Old dog in a locket,
That lays next to my heart;
I will always love you,
Even though we had to part.

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Wednesday, August 26, 2009

Quinoa: Super Grain with Environmental Benefits -

 

Quinoa: Super Grain with Environmental Benefits

Quinoa: Super Grain with Environmental Benefits

By Marie Oser ecomii.com
May 11, 2009
File under: Healthy Eating, Vegetarian

quinoa-plated_beauty-shot.jpg

Elegant, delicious, and easy to digest, quinoa (keen-wa) is a small disk shaped seed that looks a lot like a sesame seed. Classified as a grain, quinoa is actually the seed of a leafy plant related to spinach.

Quinoa is simple to prepare and cooks in just 15 minutes to a light, fluffy consistency with a delicate, nut-like flavor. The germ is external and pulls away slightly when cooked, forming an attractive, delicate ring around the perimeter. Quinoa makes a lovely presentation and can be used in place of most other grains in any recipe.

Revered as sacred by the ancient Incas, quinoa has been recognized as a “superfood” because of its remarkable nutritional value. Like soybeans, quinoa is exceptionally high in lysine, an amino acid that is rare among vegetables. This versatile grain is high in protein, calcium and iron, a good source of phosphorous, vitamin E and several of the B vitamins. In addition to all this, quinoa tastes terrific!

Before cooking, quinoa must be rinsed thoroughly several times in a wire mesh colander to remove saponin, a bitter, resin-like substance that is thought to be a natural insect repellent. The seed coat contains the saponin compounds that keep the crop nearly untouched by birds.

Two studies¹ in 2008 have shown the effectiveness of saponin used as a natural pesticide in controlling agricultural pests, such as the Iberian Slug and a variety of invasive snails that can cause extensive damage to seedlings, leaves, shoots and roots.

Chemical pesticides damage the environment, upset the balance of the ecosystem and have been shown to have carcinogenic and other adverse health effects on wildlife the human body. Biological substances like saponin offer safe and sustainable natural alternatives.

Elegant and delicious, Quinoa Paella is a healthful rendition of the Spanish classic. Soyrizo, a plant-based alternative to traditional chorizo, is available at natural food stores and many supermarkets across the country. Perfect for a dinner party, Quinoa Paella makes a lovely presentation and reheats well.

Quinoa Paella

Quinoa is high in magnesium, which helps dilate blood vessels, good for diabetics who are at higher risk for coronary heart disease.

12 servings
2 (1 oz. pkg) dried Portobello mushrooms
1¼ cups water
¼ tsp saffron
½ cup chardonnay (or other white wine)
1 pkg Melissa’s or ElBurrito Soyrizo (soy chorizo)
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 medium onion, chopped
1/2 medium red bell pepper, chopped
2 zucchini sliced
2 cups quinoa, rinsed thoroughly
2 medium tomatoes, diced
1 (13 ½ oz.) can artichoke hearts, drained
4 cups hot vegetable broth

Combine portobello mushrooms and water in a medium saucepan simmer for 15 minutes, and set aside. In a small bowl, combine saffron and wine, and set aside. Spray an electric skillet or Dutch oven with olive oil cooking spray, add the Soyrizo at medium high heat. Break Soyrizo into small pieces with a fork and cook 8 minutes or until crisp and brown. Remove Soyrizo from the pan and set aside. Spray the pan with olive oil, add garlic, onions, bell pepper and zucchini. Cook for 3 minutes and add quinoa. Cook mixture for 3 minutes, add artichoke hearts, tomatoes, saffron/chardonney mixture and broth, stirring briefly after each addition. Reduce heat, cover and and simmer for 15 minutes. Top with Soyrizo and serve immediately.

Quinoa Paella

Nutrition Analysis: per 2 cup serving

Protein: 13g, Carbohydrate: 33.g, Fiber: 5g,
Fat: 7g, Sat Fat: 0g, Cholesterol 0 mg,
Calcium 71 mg  Sodium 441mg

Calories: 208
from Protein: 20%
from Carbohydrate: 53%
from Fat: 24%

Quinoa: Super Grain with Environmental Benefits - from ecomii blogs

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

How To Make a Compost Bin from a Plastic Storage Container

How To Make a Compost Bin from a Plastic Storage Container
By Colleen Vanderlinden, About.com

Compost bin made from a plastic storage container.

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If you don't have much space to compost, or just want to start composting on a small scale before committing to a full size bin, consider making a compost bin from a plastic storage container. This is an easy project that will give you finished compost in a short period of time.
Difficulty: Easy
Time Required: 30 minutes
Here's How:

Obtain a plastic storage bin.
Plastic storage bins are available just about everywhere, and most of us have at least one of them in our basement or garage. The bigger the storage bin is, the better. The bin you decide to use for composting should be no smaller than 18 gallons. The bin must have a lid. If you are able to obtain a second lid, this would be perfect to catch the liquid that leaches out of the bin. Otherwise, this nutrient-filled liquid will just be wasted.

Prepare the bin.
You need to have air circulating around your compost to help it decompose faster. To manage this in a plastic bin, you will have to drill holes in the bin. It really doesn't matter what size drill bit you use, as long as you drill plenty of holes. Space them one to two inches apart, on all sides, bottom, and lid. If you use a large spade or hole-cutting drill bit, you may want to line the interior of the bin with wire mesh or hardware cloth to keep rodents out.

Place your bin in a convenient spot.
Because this bin is so small, it will fit just about anywhere. If you are a yardless gardener, a patio, porch, or balcony will work just fine. If you have plenty of space, consider putting it outside the kitchen door so that you can compost kitchen scraps easily, or near your vegetable garden so that you can toss weeds or trimmings into it. It can also go inside a garage or storage shed if you'd rather not look at it.

Filling the bin.
Anything you would throw in a normal compost pile, you can throw into your storage container composter: leaves, weeds, fruit and vegetable peels, egg shells, coffee grounds, tea bags, and grass clippings all work well. Anything you put into the storage bin composter should be chopped fairly small so it will break down quicker in the small space. Fruit and vegetable trimmings can be chopped small with a knife, or run through a blender or food processor to break them down. Chop leaves by running a lawn mower over them a few times. Crush eggshells finely so they will break down faster.

Maintain your bin.
Every day or so, as you think of it, you can aerate the bin by giving it a quick shake.

If the contents of the bin are staying very wet, or there is an unpleasant odor coming from the bin, you'll need to add some shredded fall leaves, shredded newspaper, or sawdust to the bin. These will dry it out and help restore the ratio of greens to browns that makes compost happen more quickly.

If the contents are very dry, use a spray bottle to moisten the contents, or add plenty of moisture-rich items such as fruits or veggies that are past their prime.

Harvesting and using your compost.
The easiest way to harvest the finished compost from your bin is to run it all through a simple compost sifter so that the large pieces are kept out of the finished compost. Anything that still needs to decompose can go back into the bin, and the dark, crumbly finished compost can either be stored in a bucket or bin for later use or immediately used in the garden. It is also wonderful to use in container plantings.

A plastic storage bin composter can be used year-round, and is a convenient solution for those of us who don't have space for a large pile.

Tips:

Do this project outside. The drilling step creates quite a mess.
If possible, toss a few handfuls of leaves or shredded newspaper into the bin whenever you add very wet items to maintain the correct moisture levels.
To turn the compost easily, just give the bin a shake every couple days.
What You Need:

Plastic storage bin, eighteen gallons or larger
Drill and sharp drill bits
Kitchen scraps, yard waste, or shredded newspaper to fill the bin
Wire mesh, if you are drilling large holes
More Organic Gardening How To's

Saturday, August 22, 2009

Sprouted Buckwheat is Simple and Delicious

Significance
TheGaianDragon...com
Love for the Earth
JamesClairLewis...com
Portal of Heart
Awakening Earth




Sprouted Buckwheat is Simple and Delicious
Tuesday, June 30, 2009 by: Sheryl Walters, citizen journalist


Sprouting takes a nut or seed that is dormant and brings it to life. You can watch as a food that has been sitting in a bag on a shelf for months begins to grow a little sprout and transforms. One of the easiest foods to sprout is buckwheat. Buckwheat becomes packed with live enzymes and vital nutrients when sprouted.

Sprouted buckwheat is an amazing food because it tastes like a grain but is actually gluten and wheat free and not a grain at all. It is one of the most complete sources of protein on the planet, containing all eight essential amino acids. This makes it perfect for diabetics and those who want to cut down on their sugary carbohydrates and to balance their blood sugar levels. It is also known to lower high blood pressure. Sprouted buckwheat also cleanses the colon and alkalizes the body.

Buckwheat is a wonderful super food for people who have varicose veins or hardening of the arteries. One of the reasons is that it is full of rutin, which is a compound that is known as a powerful capillary wall strengthener. When veins become weak, blood and fluids accumulate and leak into nearby tissues, which may cause varicose veins or hemorrhoids.

This healing food is also rich in lecithin, making it a wonderful cholesterol balancer because lecithin soaks up "bad" cholesterol and prevents it from being absorbed. Lecithin neutralizes toxins and purifies the lymphatic system, taking some of the load off of the liver.

Sprouted buckwheat is also a brain boosting super food. 28% of the brain is actually made up of lecithin. Research suggests that regularly consuming foods rich in lecithin may actually prevent anxiety, depression, brain fog, mental fatigue and generally make the brain sharper and clearer.

Buckwheat is high in iron so it is a good blood builder. It also prevents osteoporosis because of its high boron and calcium levels.

Sprouted buckwheat is high in bioflavonoids, flavonols and co-enzyme Q10. It contains all of the B vitamins, magnesium, manganese, and selenium, as well as many other health giving compounds.

How to Sprout Buckwheat

Place 2/3 Cup of buckwheat groats into a bowl and cover it with 2- 3 5times as much room temperature water. Mix the seeds up so that none are floating on the top. Allow the seeds to soak for about an hour. You need to give them plenty of time to soak, but also remember that buckwheat groats can take in too much water which will keep them from sprouting.

Drain the water in a colander and let them stand, rinsing 3 times per day with cool water for 2 days. You will notice a goopy substance on the buckwheat, which is starch. Make sure that you wash this off thoroughly.

At first you will notice a brown spot, and will then see a little sprout coming out.

Sprouted Buckwheat Chocolate Banana Sundae
1 Banana
1 cup Sprouted Buckwheat
1 Teaspoon Raw Chocolate Powder
1 Teaspoon Lucuma
1 Teaspoon Agave Nectar
Splash of Warm Water

Smash up the banana and add all of the other ingredients. You can add more buckwheat if you want it thicker. This makes an amazing breakfast cereal or desert.

sproutpeoplesee..d
herbsarespecial
vegancoach...


About the author
Sheryl is a kinesiologist, nutritionist and holistic practitioner.
Her website younglivingguid..e provides the latest research on preventing disease, looking naturally gorgeous, and feeling emotionally and physically fabulous. You can also find some of the most powerful super foods on the planet including raw chocolate, purple corn, and many others.

naturalnews buckwheat

Monday, August 17, 2009

Rosemary & Thyme Act As Eco-Friendly Pesticides

http://www.india-server.com/news/rosemary-thyme-act-as-eco-friendly-10914.html


Many herbs like rosemary, thyme, clove and mint can act as natural killer weapons against pests. The industry is turning to these natural pesticides as the fruits and vegetables produced in natural ways are more in demand.
These herbs form a relatively new type of natural insecticides that have the potential to act as eco-friendly alternatives to synthetic chemical pesticides.
"We are exploring the potential use of natural pesticides based on plant essential oils - commonly used in foods and beverages as flavourings," said study presenter Murray Isman of the University of British Columbia (UBC).
These new pesticides, in general, are formed as mixtures of tiny amounts of two or more different herbs diluted in water. Some kill insects outright, while others repel them.
There are quite a few natural pesticides that are being used by farmers for protecting organic strawberry, spinach, and tomato crops against destructive aphids and mites.
"These products expand the limited arsenal of organic growers to combat pests. They're still only a small piece of the insecticide market, but they're growing and gaining momentum," he said.
The natural pesticides provide many advantages over the conventional pesticides. The natural "killer spices" do not require extensive regulatory approval and are readily available.
There is yet another advantage. Insects may not develop resistance to these pesticides as like the other pesticides. These are a safer option for farm workers also.
But they do have their own disadvantages. Since these essential oils evaporate quickly and degrade rapidly in sunlight, frequent application will be required.
Attempts to develop the natural pesticides that last longer and more potent are being made.
These findings have been presented at the American Chemical Society's 238th National Meeting.

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

GROW YOUR OWN FOOD IN YOUR APARTMENT YEAR-ROUND!




http://windowfarms.org/

545 vs 300,000,000

EVERY CITIZEN NEEDS TO READ THIS AND THINK ABOUT WHAT THIS JOURNALIST HAS SCRIPTED IN THIS MESSAGE. READ IT AND THEN REALLY THINK ABOUT OUR CURRENT POLITICAL DEBACLE.

Charley Reese has been a journalist for 49 years.

545 PEOPLE

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By Charlie Reese

Politicians are the only people in the world who create problems and then campaign against them.

Have you ever wondered, if both the Democrats and the Republicans are against deficits, WHY do we have deficits?

Have you ever wondered, if all the politicians are against inflation and high taxes, WHY do we have inflation and high taxes?

You and I don't propose a federal budget. The president does.

You and I don't have the Constitutional authority to vote on appropriations. The House of Representatives does.

You and I don't write the tax code, Congress does.

You and I don't set fiscal policy, Congress does.

You and I don't control monetary policy, the Federal Reserve Bank does.

One hundred senators, 435 congressmen, one president, and nine Supreme Court justices equates to 545 human beings out of the 300 million are directly, legally, morally, and individually responsible for the domestic problems that plague this country.

I excluded the members of the Federal Reserve Board because that problem was created by the Congress. In 1913, Congress delegated its Constitutional duty to provide a sound currency to a federally chartered, but private, central bank.

I excluded all the special interests and lobbyists for a sound reason.. They have no legal authority. They have no ability to coerce a senator, a congressman, or a president to do one cotton-picking thing. I don't care if they offer a politician $1 million dollars in cash. The politician has the power to accept or reject it. No matter what the lobbyist promises, it is the legislator's responsibility to determine how he votes.

Those 545 human beings spend much of their energy convincing you that what they did is not their fault. They cooperate in this common con regardless of party.
What separates a politician from a normal human being is an excessive amount of gall. No normal human being would have the gall of a Speaker, who stood up and criticized the President for creating deficits.. The president can only propose a budget. He cannot force the Congress to accept it.

The Constitution, which is the supreme law of the land, gives sole responsibility to the House of Representatives for originating and approving appropriations and taxes. Who is the speaker of the House? Nancy Pelosi. She is the leader of the majority party. She and fellow House members, not the president, can approve any budget they want. If the president vetoes it, they can pass it over his veto if they agree to.

It seems inconceivable to me that a nation of 300 million can not replace 545 people who stand convicted -- by present facts -- of incompetence and irresponsibility. I can't think of a single domestic problem that is not traceable directly to those 545 people. When you fully grasp the plain truth that 545 people exercise the power of the federal government, then it must follow that what exists is what they want to exist.

If the tax code is unfair, it's because they want it unfair.

If the budget is in the red, it's because they want it in the red ..

If the Army &Marines are in IRAQ , it's because they want them in IRAQ

If they do not receive social security but are on an elite retirement plan not available to the people, it's because they want it that way.

There are no insoluble government problems.

Do not let these 545 people shift the blame to bureaucrats, whom they hire and whose jobs they can abolish; to lobbyists, whose gifts and advice they can reject; to regulators, to whom they give the power to regulate and from whom they can take this power. Above all, do not let them con you into the belief that there exists disembodied mystical forces like "the economy," "inflation," or "politics" that prevent them from doing what they take an oath to do.

Those 545 people, and they alone, are responsible.

They, and they alone, have the power.

They, and they alone, should be held accountable by the people who are their bosses.

Provided the voters have the gumption to manage their own employees.

We should vote all of them out of office and clean up their mess!

Charlie Reese is a former columnist of the Orlando Sentinel Newspaper.

What you do with this article now that you have read it.......... Is up to you.


This might be funny if it weren't so darned true.
Be sure to read all the way to the end:

Tax his land,
Tax his bed,
Tax the table
At which he's fed.

Tax his tractor,
Tax his mule,
Teach him taxes
Are the rule.

Tax his work,
Tax his pay,
He works for peanuts
Anyway!
Tax his cow,
Tax his goat,
Tax his pants,
Tax his coat.
Tax his ties,
Tax his shirt,
Tax his work,
Tax his dirt.

Tax his tobacco,
Tax his drink,
Tax him if he
Tries to think.

Tax his cigars,
Tax his beers,
If he cries
Tax his tears.

Tax his car,
Tax his gas,
Find other ways
To tax his ass.

Tax all he has
Then let him know
That you won't be done
Till he has no dough.

When he screams and hollers;
Then tax him some more,
Tax him till
He's good and sore.
Then tax his coffin,
Tax his grave,
Tax the sod in
Which he's laid.

Put these words
Upon his tomb,
Taxes drove me
to my doom...'

When he's gone,
Do not relax,
Its time to apply
The inheritance tax.
Accounts Receivable Tax
Building Permit Tax
CDL license Tax
Cigarette Tax
Corporate Income Tax
Dog License Tax
Excise Taxes
Federal Income Tax
Federal Unemployment Tax (FUTA)
Fishing License Tax
Food License Tax
Fuel Permit Tax
Gasoline Tax (currently 44.75 cents per gallon)
Gross Receipts Tax
Hunting License Tax
Inheritance Tax
Inventory Tax
IRS Interest Charges IRS Penalties (tax on top of tax)
Liquor Tax
Luxury Taxes
Marriage License Tax
Medicare Tax
Personal Property Tax
Property Tax
Real Estate Tax
Service Charge T ax
Social Security Tax
Road Usage Tax
Sales Tax
Recreational Vehicle Tax
School Tax
State Income Tax
State Unemployment Tax (SUTA)
Telephone Federal Excise Tax
Telephone Federal Universal Ser vice FeeTax
Telephone Federal, State and Local Surcharge Taxes
Telephone Minimum Usage Surcharge=2 0Tax
Telephone Recurring and Non-recurring Charges Tax
Telephone State and Local Tax
Telephone Usage Charge Tax
Utility Taxes
Vehicle License Registration Tax
Vehicle Sales Tax
Watercraft Registration Tax
Well Permit Tax
Workers Compensation Tax

STILL THINK THIS IS FUNNY? Not one of these taxes existed 100 years ago, and our nation was the most prosperous in the world. We had absolutely no national debt, had the largest middle class in the world, and Mom stayed home to raise the kids.
What in the hell happened? Can you spell 'politicians?'
And I still have to 'press 1' for English!?

I hope this goes around THE USA at least 100 times!!! YOU can help it get there!!!
GO AHEAD - - - BE AN AMERICAN!!!

Saturday, August 1, 2009

Sustainable Living: The best government money can buy!

Sustainable Living: The best government money can buy!
Growing Old With Dogs

When I am old....
I will wear soft gray sweatshirts,
and a bandanna over my silver hair,
and I will spend my social security checks on wine and my dogs.

I will sit in my house on my well-worn chair and listen to my dogs breathing.

I will sneak out in the middle of a warm summer night
and take my dogs for a run,if my old bones will allow.

When people come to call......
I will smile and nod as I show them my dogs......
and talk of them and about them;
the ones so beloved of the past
and the ones so beloved today.

I will still work hard cleaning after them,
mopping and feeding them and whispering their
names in a soft loving way.

I will wear the gleaming sweat on my throat, like a jewel
and I will be an embarrassment to all...especially my family....
who have not yet found the peace in being free
to have dogs as your very best friends.

These friends who will always wait at any hour,
for your footfall....and eagerly jump to their
feet out of a sound sleep,to greet you as if you are a God.

With warm eyes full of adoring love
and hope that you will always stay,
I'll hug their big strong necks.....
I'll kiss their dear sweet heads......
and whisper in their very special company.

I look in the Mirror......
..And see I am getting old.

This is the kind of person I am and have always been.

Loving dogs is easy, they are part of me.

Please accept me for who I am.

My dogs appreciate my presence in their lives...
they love my presence in their lives.

When I am old, this will be important to me.

You will understand when you grow old......
if you have dogs to love too.


~Author Unknown

About Me

My photo

~Nature is my Religion~  Eccentric, Atheist, Freethinker, Paganistic (minus the god/s)  Free Spirited Old Hippie-type, A Mediocre Artist & Jewelry Maker, Writer of Bad Poetry,  Lover of Whimsy, Thunderstorms, Books, cheap Red Wine & the unconventional. I  Seek a quiet life close to Nature and grow veggies and herbs, compost, day dream. 
'Veni, Vidi, Vixi'.  -translated-  'I came, I saw, I Lived'.  (Contemplations,  by Victor Hugo).